Carrying supplies on the head in Maio

Carrying goods on the beach

The ladies in Cape Verde are often skilled at carrying items on their heads. This picture was taken on the beach in Vila do Maio on the island of Maio.

Cape Verde residency permits

Residency permits for foreign nationals

The parliament in Cape Verde has passed a act of parliament that will enable the granting of permanent residency permits to foreign owners of homes in the country. These permits will mean that owners will be given priority at the offices of the Foreign and Borders Service. Such priorities will also include a spouse and children aged under 14.

These Residency Permits will apply to properties costing over €80,000 in towns where the Gross Domestic Product is below the national average. In towns where the GDP is higher than the national average, it will apply to properties costing over €120,000.

The same bill also gives some exemptions from the Single Property Tax on the relevant properties. Retired people living in Cape Verde, but with income from elsewhere, will also receive some tax exemptions.

Sand from Sahara over Cape Verde

Saharan sand over Cape Verde

In winter, winds known as the Harmatten blow west over the Sahara Desert. In the process the winds pick up sand and dust from the Sahara and blow it over the Atlantic. This year, at the end of January, NASA’s satellites picked up images of the Saharan sand over the ocean and over the Cape Verde islands.

The mountainous islands, such as Santiago, São Nicolau and Santo Antão block some of the sand. As a result there is less dust on the west side of the archipelago. The sand blows across the Atlantic to the Caribbean and the Gulf of Mexico. The sand fertilises the sea with nutrients, which can promote the growth of plankton, but can also bring about damage to coral reefs, because of micro-organisms it contains.